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Social Security closes offices as baby boomers age

Social Security closes offices as baby boomers age

SOCIAL SECURITY:This photo shows the Social Security Administration's main campus in Woodlawn, Md. A new congressional report says the Social Security Administration has been closing a record number of field offices, even as millions of baby boomers approach retirement. The agency blames budget constraints. As a result, seniors seeking information and help from the agency are facing increasingly long waits in person and on the phone. Photo: Associated Press/Patrick Semansky

STEPHEN OHLEMACHER, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — A new congressional report says the Social Security Administration has been closing a record number of field offices, even as millions of baby boomers approach retirement.

The agency blames budget constraints.

As a result, seniors seeking information and help from the agency are facing increasingly long waits, in person and on the phone.

The report was done by the bipartisan staff of the Senate Special Committee on Aging. It says Social Security has closed 64 field offices since 2010, the largest number of closures in a five-year period in the agency’s history. The agency has also closed 533 temporary mobile offices that often serve remote areas.

The Senate committee is holding a hearing on the report Wednesday afternoon.

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